‘Heroin chic and the tangled legacy of photographer Davide Sorrenti

A new documentary about the late fashion photographer, who died at the age of 20, recalls the rise of the controversial look with which he made his name There is a sequence in See Know Evil, a new documentary-biography of the late photographer Davide Sorrenti, when the then US president, Bill Clinton, takes time out of a prayer breakfast to comment on heroin chic, the provocatively titled mid-90s style of fashion photography that was accused of glamourising super-skinny, strung-out models. The president clearly liked to keep an eye on fashion he had previously complained about Calvin Klein photographs of half-dressed adolescents but this was a more forceful, overtly political interjection. You do not need to glamourise addiction to sell clothes, …

So beautiful I cried: Rachel Whiteread, Jeremy Deller and more on the thrill of the Venice Biennale

Jeremy Deller unleashed a yacht-throwing colossus and Rachel Whiteread hit the streets with a vacuum cleaner six leading artists recall representing Britain at the arts extravaganza I was Indian and it didnt matter Anish Kapoor, before the so-called YBAs (Young British Artists); they were just leaving art school. Exposure on this scale, in my mid-30s, was extraordinary. As an artist, you have a certain kind of language you are trying to get into the world. At Venice, I had the experience, for the first time, of people reflecting back to me the work telling me, if you like, what I was doing. At the pavilion we gave out can you believe it? the first-ever bag with my name on it. …

Swept away: the art and artefacts destroyed by the worlds greatest museums

A sitar that once belonged to George Harrison was broken at the V&A and this was far from the first time a gallery has had to make an awkward apology Anyone who has ever been told off by a snippy museum guard for getting too close to an artwork may be interested to learn that galleries and their staff are not always the unassailable guardians of culture they appear to be. It has emerged that V&A staff dropped the precious sitar that George Harrison played on Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band and broke it in two. It hit the ground and the gourd bounced away, revealed a catalogue of breakages by staff at the Scottish National Museum of Modern …