American endurance athlete becomes the first person to cross Antarctica solo

(CNN)American endurance athlete Colin O’Brady became the first person to cross Antarctica solo without help after 54 days traversing the barren, frigid continent, he said in an Instagram post.

“FINISH LINE!!! I did it!” he wrote.
View this post on Instagram

Day 54: FINISH LINE!!! I did it! The Impossible First ✅. 32 hours and 30 minutes after leaving my last camp early Christmas morning, I covered the remaining ~80 miles in one continuous “Antarctica Ultramarathon” push to the finish line. The wooden post in the background of this picture marks the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf, where Antarctica’s land mass ends and the sea ice begins. As I pulled my sled over this invisible line, I accomplished my goal: to become the first person in history to traverse the continent of Antarctica coast to coast solo, unsupported and unaided. While the last 32 hours were some of the most challenging hours of my life, they have quite honestly been some of the best moments I have ever experienced. I was locked in a deep flow state the entire time, equally focused on the end goal, while allowing my mind to recount the profound lessons of this journey. I’m delirious writing this as I haven’t slept yet. There is so much to process and integrate and there will be many more posts to acknowledge the incredible group of people who supported this project. But for now, I want to simply recognize my #1 who I, of course, called immediately upon finishing. I burst into tears making this call. I was never alone out there. @jennabesaw you walked every step with me and guided me with your courage and strength. WE DID IT!! We turned our dream into reality and proved that The Impossible First is indeed possible. “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” – Nelson Mandela. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

A post shared by Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) on

A wooden post in the background of the photo O’Brady shared on Instagram, he said, is the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf, which marked the end of his trip.
    “As I pulled my sled over this invisible line, I accomplished my goal: to become the first person in history to traverse the continent of Antarctica coast to coast solo, unsupported and unaided,” he wrote.
    “While the last 32 hours were some of the most challenging hours of my life, they have quite honestly been some of the best moments I have ever experienced. I was locked in a deep flow state the entire time, equally focused on the end goal, while allowing my mind to recount the profound lessons of this journey.”
    O’Brady began his trek at the Ronne Ice Shelf, traveled from there to the South Pole, and then crossed to the Ross Ice Shelf, he said. He documented much of the trip on his Instagram page, even as he fought fierce wind storms, subzero temperatures and whiteout conditions.
    To complete the trip, he needed to cross several mountainous areas and travel over miles of sastrugi, which are hard wavelike ridges in the snow and ice formed by wind.
    View this post on Instagram

    Day 19: PRISTINE BEAUTY. Today during a break, an empty plastic bag slipped out of my hands and got caught by the wind. Having been raised with a Leave No Trace ethic in the outdoors, I instinctively unclipped from my harness and took off running through the deep snow after the bag. After about 100 meters I finally dove into the snow and grabbed it. There is nothing like the untouched beauty of this place it would break my heart to think about polluting it even just a tiny bit. Then something really interesting happened. I looked back at my sled and I immediately felt panicked. Like a sailor thrown overboard out at sea, looking back at my sled from 100 meters away, I realized this was the furthest I have been from my “life raft” since I began. I’m never more than the length of my harness rope away from it. My fear was completely irrational of course as there was nothing wrong with stepping away. But the perspective looking back made me realize that my sled has begun to feel an extension of myself, albeit heavy, it’s equipped with everything I need to survive out here. I guess with no loving things around, I’ve grown a deep attachment to an inanimate object. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

    A post shared by Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) on

    O’Brady is not the first to attempt the trip. British explorer Henry Worsley tried a solo trek of Antarctica in 2016, but he had to be rescued 30 miles from the finish and later died of an infection. He had traveled for 71 days unaided before that point.
      Worsley launched the attempt a century after Ernest Shackleton, the famed Antarctic explorer, survived a failed attempt to cross the continent.
      Another explorer, Lou Rudd, began a solo trek of Antarctica without help on the same day as O’Brady did. Rudd reached the South Pole on December 13 and is about 90% done with the trip, according to a Shackleton brand webpage set up to track his expedition.

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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